General Anaesthetics

GENERAL ANAESTHETICS

First a firm focus on our patient’s safety and comfort we would like to familiarize you with the following helpful information as you begin
to prepare for your procedure with us. Your procedure will be administered under general Anaesthetic as such we hope this guide helps to answer
any questions you may have and explain our strong commitment to your safety and well-being.
Your general Anaesthetic will be administered and managed by a highly qualified and experienced Anaesthesiologist.
All our Anaesthesiologists are highly trained medical specialists. Medical School training several years of experience
in major hospitals is only the beginning of the certification process after which Anaesthetists spend an additional 5 to 6 years undergoing
specialist training in Anaesthesia and Pain Management. Our on-site Anaesthetist will put you into a state of carefully controlled unconsciousness
for the duration of your procedure utilizing Anaesthetic drugs administered intravenously. The level of Anaesthesia is calculated and constantly
adjusted with great precision as your vital signs are monitored with sophisticated equipment.

Your Anaesthetist needs to know about your general health and well being in order to minimise any risk to you during your procedure:

Health issue

• Inform the Anaesthetist if you currently have or had in the past any kind of health problems and/ or recent illness (Particularly in relation to heart or breathing problems.)

Allergies

• Please inform the Anaesthetist if you have any allergies, Particular to penicillin or latex.
• Inform your Anaesthetist if you have experienced any issues with previous operations and or Anaesthetics.

Prescription medication

• In general, Prescription medications should continue to be as scheduled. Please bring these with you when you attend for your procedure. Unless instructed otherwise, You may take these at your regular times with a sip of water (even whilst fasting for your procedure).

Blood-Thinning Medications

• You must inform the Anaesthetist if are taking Aspirin, or other blood thinning drugs (Such as Warfarin, Plavix and Pradaxa). You will be advised prior to your procedure if and when they should be ceased. Don not stop any medications unless medical advice.

Smoking, Alcohol & Narcotics

• Ideally you should stop smoking 6 weeks prior to any surgery.
• Notify your Anaesthetist if you use illicit drugs or consume alcohol in large amounts. These may significantly influence your anaesthetic requirement.

Important instruction prior to your procedure

You must NOT eat or drink for at least 6 hours prior to your procedure. This is because any food or fluid present in the stomach may be vomited and could enter your lungs while you are anaesthetic and unconscious and this could become life-threating. If you do not follow this STRICT fasting rule, your procedure may be postponed or cancelled in the interested of your safety.

If your procedure is scheduled for the morning do not eat and drink midnight the night before, If your procedure is scheduled for the afternoon, dot not eat and drink after 7 AM on the morning of your procedure.

NO FOOD – this include all solids, no chewing gum, no lollies, no mints.
NO LIQUIDS – no water (other than a sip for medications), no coffee, no tea, no juice or milk.
Please wear comfortable and loose fitting casual clothing to our procedure.

Anaesthesia — Risks and Complications

With the stringent qualification criteria, education and experience requirements and post-graduate training; there is no safer place in the world to be anaesthetised than here in Australia, nevertheless some people are at increased risk for complications, particularly because of existing health problems such as heart and respiratory disease, diabetics, obesity and other pre-existing illnesses. Even healthy patients have risks.
Common side effects following Anaesthesia include: bruising or pain at the side of injections, a sore throat, and postoperative nausea or vomiting. These are generally only short-lived. The risk of these is about 1 in 3 in 100 patients.

Uncommon side effects include persisting hoarse voice, prolonged nausea and vomiting, Post-operative breathing problems, damage to lips, tongue, eyes and teeth, pins and needles or weakness from pressure on nerves in the arms or legs, and aspiration pneumonia stomach contents. The risk of these is about 5000 patients.
Very rare side effects includes awareness, Heart attack, stroke, paralysis, deep vein thrombosis death. The risk of these is about 1 in 5000 to 1 patents. Your anaesthetist will be happy to further you prior to your procedure.

Recovery & Post-Op

Post Operation our staff will continue to monitor your condition to ensure you recover without any issues. It is normal that during the recovery phase you may be given some oxygen significantly is you feel a little drowsy or dizzy. You may also experience a dry or sore throat and have a sight headache and short-term memory loss – these side effects usually pass quite quickly with many of our patients recovering within 60 to 90 minutes. If however you or your Anaesthetists have any concerns they will continue to monitor you until they feel you are well enough to go home.

Going Home

It is essentials that you make arrangements for a responsible adult to collect you from the clinic and drive you home. You will not be allowed to drive yourself home, go home alone in a taxi or via public transport.

A responsible adult MUST also stay with you overnight after your procedure. For your own safety, you should NOT be able to alone during these periods.

Failure to provide a responsible adult to pick you will result in your procedure being cancelled. Even if you feel unaffected, for the remainder of the day you must NOT:
• Drive a car
• Use or operate machinery
• Make any important decisions or sign any legal or financial documents
• Drink alcohol or tale illicit drugs

What to bring on the day of surgery?

At the time your procedure is booked, our staff will provide you with a consent from to take home and read carefully before signing. You must complete this form and then bring it with you on the day of surgery. The consent form also details your anaesthetics fee which must be paid by credit card and is due on the same day.

If you have any further issue or questions regarding any aspects of your upcoming Anaesthetics please do not hesitate to call us.

Blood-Thinning Medications

• You must inform the anaesthetist if are taking Aspirin, or other blood thinning drugs (Such as Warfarin, Plavix and Pradaxa). You will be advised prior to your procedure if and when they should be ceased. Don not stop any medications unless medical advice.

Smoking, Alcohol & Narcotics

• Ideally you should stop smoking 6 weeks prior to any surgery.
• Notify your anaesthetist if you use illicit drugs or consume alcohol in large amounts. These may significantly influence your anaesthetic requirement.

Important instruction prior to your procedure

You must NOT eat or drink for at least 6 hours prior to your procedure. This is because any food or fluid present in the stomach may be vomited and could enter your lungs while you are anaesthetic and unconscious and this could become life-threating. If you do not follow this STRICT fasting rule, your procedure may be postponed or cancelled in the interested of your safety.

If your procedure is scheduled for the morning do not eat and drink midnight the night before, If your procedure is scheduled for the afternoon, dot not eat and drink after 7 AM on the morning of your procedure.

NO FOOD – this include all solids, no chewing gum, no lollies, no mints.
NO LIQUIDS – no water (other than a sip for medications), no coffee, no tea, no juice or milk.
Please wear comfortable and loose fitting casual clothing to our procedure.

Anaesthesia — Risks and Complications

With the stringent qualification criteria, education and experience requirements and post-graduate training; there is no safer place in the world to be anaesthetised than here in Australia, nevertheless some people are at increased risk for complications, particularly because of existing health problems such as heart and respiratory disease, diabetics, obesity and other pre-existing illnesses. Even healthy patients have risks.
Common side effects following anaesthesia include: bruising or pain at the side of injections, a sore throat, and postoperative nausea or vomiting. These are generally only short-lived. The risk of these is about 1 in 3 in 100 patients.

Uncommon side effects include persisting hoarse voice, prolonged nausea and vomiting, Post-operative breathing problems, damage to lips, tongue, eyes and teeth, pins and needles or weakness from pressure on nerves in the arms or legs, and aspiration pneumonia stomach contents. The risk of these is about 5000 patients.
Very rare side effects includes awareness, Heart attack, stroke, paralysis, deep vein thrombosis death. The risk of these is about 1 in 5000 to 1 patents. Your anaesthetist will be happy to further you prior to your procedure.

Recovery & Post-Op

Post Operation our staff will continue to monitor your condition to ensure you recover without any issues. It is normal that during the recovery phase you may be given some oxygen significantly is you feel a little drowsy or dizzy. You may also experience a dry or sore throat and have a sight headache and short-term memory loss – these side effects usually pass quite quickly with many of our patients recovering within 60 to 90 minutes. If however you or your anaesthetists have any concerns they will continue to monitor you until they feel you are well enough to go home.

Going Home

It is essentials that you make arrangements for a responsible adult to collect you from the clinic and drive you home. You will not be allowed to drive yourself home, go home alone in a taxi or via public transport.

A responsible adult MUST also stay with you overnight after your procedure. For your own safety, you should NOT be able to alone during these periods.

Failure to provide a responsible adult to pick you will result in your procedure being cancelled. Even if you feel unaffected, for the remainder of the day you must NOT:
• Drive a car
• Use or operate machinery
• Make any important decisions or sign any legal or financial documents
• Drink alcohol or tale illicit drugs

What to bring on the day of surgery?

At the time your procedure is booked, our staff will provide you with a consent from to take home and read carefully before signing. You must complete this form and then bring it with you on the day of surgery. The consent form also details your anaesthetics fee which must be paid by credit card and is due on the same day.

If you have any further issue or questions regarding any aspects of your upcoming anaesthetics please do not hesitate to call us.

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